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Guanacaste Conservation Area, Costa Rica


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The Guanacaste Conservation Area program began in 1971 as the 26,000-acre Santa Rosa National Park. Expansion of this tropical dry forest began in 1986 with the goal of restoring and conserving an entire tropical dry forest ecosystem. Today the Guanacaste Conservation Area is about 56 miles long, stretching 10 miles into the Pacific Ocean from below sea level to 6,286 feet, providing movement for animals and plants with the onset of global climate change. Guanacaste contains roughly 2.4% of the world's terrestrial biodiversity, or 60% of the species that occur in Costa Rica. Extensive inventories have been conducted for all plants and animals. Every child within 50 kilometers has visited the park, learning first hand the importance of saving this critical biodiversity.

Today the Guanacaste Conservation Area is 402,610 acres of tropical dry forest in northwestern Costa Rica supporting 140 species of mammals over 300 species of birds and 100 species of amphibians and reptiles. porcupineYour contribution will be used to purchase and protect 10,000 acres of rainforest to be added to the Guanacaste Conservation Area. Once saved, it will add another 30,000 species to the 300,000 species that make their home in the tropical dry forest. These lands are host to a rich array of flora and fauna, including the jaguars, ocelots, pumas, howler monkeys, spider monkeys, white-faced capuchins, and white throated magpie-jays. Its coast provides nesting sites for the olive ridley turtles. Saving this critical ecosystem will mitigate the climate change impact on both the dry forest and the rainforest. Every 2 1/2 acres locks down 300 tons of carbon forever.

 

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news from the forest

orchid thumbThis orchid Epidendrum radicans is found in Guanacaste at elevations from sea level to 12,000 feet.


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